Asp net core mvc not calling system text jsons custom polymorphic jsonconverter

Introduction

ASP.NET is a popular programming language used for building web applications. It provides a framework for developing dynamic , web services, and web applications. One of the key features of ASP.NET is its ability to handle data serialization and deserialization, is crucial for exchanging data between the and the server.

Problem: Asp net core mvc not calling system text jsons custom polymorphic jsonconverter

One common issue that face when working with ASP.NET Core MVC is the failure to call the custom polymorphic JsonConverter provided by the System.Text.Json . This can lead to unexpected behavior and errors when serializing or deserializing JSON data.

Solution

To solve this problem, we need to ensure that the custom polymorphic JsonConverter is properly called by the ASP.NET Core MVC framework. Here are the steps to follow:

Step 1: Register the custom JsonConverter

The first step is to register the custom JsonConverter in the ConfigureServices method of the Startup class. This can be done by adding the following code:


services.AddControllers().AddJsonOptions(options =>
{
    options.JsonSerializerOptions.Converters.Add(new CustomJsonConverter());
});

In this code snippet, we are the AddJsonOptions method to configure the JSON serializer options. We add our custom JsonConverter to the Converters collection of the JsonSerializerOptions.

Step 2: Use the custom JsonConverter

Once the custom JsonConverter is registered, we can use it in our ASP.NET Core MVC controllers or models. For example, let's say we have a model called “Person” with a property called “Address” that needs to be serialized or deserialized using the custom JsonConverter. We can annotate the property with the [JsonConverter] attribute as shown :


public class Person
{
    public string Name { get; set; }

    [JsonConverter(typeof(CustomJsonConverter))]
    public Address Address { get; set; }
}

In this example, the Address property of the Person class will be serialized or deserialized using the CustomJsonConverter.

Step 3: Test the custom JsonConverter

Finally, we can test the custom JsonConverter by sending a request to our ASP.NET Core MVC application and verifying that the serialization or deserialization is performed correctly. Here's an example of how we can test it:


[]
public  GetPerson()
{
    var person = new Person
    {
        Name = "John Doe",
        Address = new Address
        {
            Street = "123 Main St",
            City = "New York",
            State = "NY"
        }
    };

    return Ok(person);
}

In this example, we have a GET that returns a Person object. The Address property of the Person object will be serialized using the custom JsonConverter.

Conclusion

By following the steps outlined above, we can ensure that the custom polymorphic JsonConverter is properly called by the ASP.NET Core MVC framework. This allows us to handle complex JSON serialization and deserialization scenarios in our web applications.

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