Asp net core 2 identity login session lost on service fabric cluster multi machi

Introduction

ASP.NET is a popular programming language used for building web applications. It provides a framework for developing , web services, and web applications. One common issue that developers face is the loss of login session in an ASP.NET Core 2 Identity application running on a Service Fabric cluster with multiple machines. In this article, we will explore this problem and provide a solution with examples.

The Problem

When running an ASP.NET Core 2 Identity application on a Service Fabric cluster with multiple machines, the login session can be lost when the user is to a different machine in the cluster. This happens because the session data is not shared between the machines, and each machine maintains its own session state.

The Solution

To this problem, we need to configure the ASP.NET Core Identity application to use a distributed cache for session storage. This allows the session data to be shared across multiple machines in the cluster.

Step 1: Configure Distributed Cache

The first step is to configure a distributed cache provider in the ASP.NET Core application. This can be done in the Startup.cs file. Here is an example of how to configure the Redis cache provider:


public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    // Other ...

    services.AddDistributedRedisCache(options =>
    {
        options.Configuration = "localhost";
        options.InstanceName = "SampleInstance";
    });

    // Other configurations...
}

In this example, we are configuring the Redis cache provider with the local Redis server running on “localhost”. You can replace this with the Redis server address for your environment.

Step 2: Configure Session

The next step is to configure the session middleware to use the distributed cache for session storage. This can be done in the Startup.cs file as well. Here is an example:


public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    // Other configurations...

    services.AddSession(options =>
    {
        options..Name = ".AspNetCore.Session";
        options.IdleTimeout = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(30);
        options.Cookie.IsEssential = true;
    });

    // Other configurations...
}

public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IHostingEnvironment env)
{
    // Other configurations...

    app.UseSession();

    // Other configurations...
}

In this example, we are configuring the session middleware to use the distributed cache for session storage. We set the session cookie name, idle timeout, and mark the cookie as essential.

Step 3: Use Session in Controllers

Finally, we can use the session in our controllers to store and retrieve data. Here is an example:


public class HomeController : Controller
{
    public IActionResult Index()
    {
        HttpContext.Session.SetString("Username", "JohnDoe");
        return View();
    }

    public IActionResult About()
    {
        string username = HttpContext.Session.GetString("Username");
        ViewData["Username"] = username;
        return View();
    }
}

In this example, we are storing the username “JohnDoe” in the session in the Index of the HomeController. We then retrieve the username in the About action and pass it to the view.

Conclusion

By configuring a distributed cache for session storage and it in our ASP.NET Core 2 Identity application running on a Service Fabric cluster with multiple machines, we can solve the problem of login session loss. This ensures that the session data is shared across all machines in the cluster, providing a seamless user .

Rate this post

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Table of Contents